Volume 5, Number 3 (Autumn 2015-- 2015)                   PTJ 2015, 5(3): 127-136 | Back to browse issues page




DOI: 10.15412/J.PTJ.07050302

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Sarabadani Tafreshi E, Nodehi Moghadam A, Bakhshi E, Rastgar M. Comparing Scapular Position and Scapular Dyskinesis in Individuals with and without Rounded Shoulder Posture. PTJ. 2015; 5 (3) :127-136
URL: http://ptj.uswr.ac.ir/article-1-260-en.html

1- Department of Physiotherapy, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
2- PhD Department of Physiotherapy, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
3- Department of Biostatics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
Abstract:   (879 Views)

Purpose: Altered kinematics of the scapula or scapular dyskinesis (downward rotation, anterior tilt, and protraction) contribute to impingement syndrome by decreasing the subacromial space. Given the critical role of scapular position and movement in the function of the shoulder, the aim of this study was to compare scapular position and dyskinesis in individuals with and without rounded shoulder posture.

Methods: By employing the convenience sampling method, 21 individuals with rounded shoulder posture (11 females and 10 males; average age: 22.95 years) and 23 individuals without rounded shoulder posture (13 females and 10 males; average age: 22.43 years) were enrolled in this study through a case-control design.The scapular dyskinesis test was used to observe alterations in scapulohumeral rhythm in the sagittal and frontal planes of the arm. Also, the scapular position was examined according to the Kibler test. Data were analyzed using SPSS 21. We used the Independent t-test and Mann-Whitney test to compare the differences between the two groups.

Results: There were no differences in scapular dyskinesis between the two groups (P>0.05). The prevalence of subtle or obvious scapular dyskinesis in individuals with rounded shoulder posture was greater than those without rounded shoulder posture, but the difference was not statistically significant. Furthermore, no significant difference was found in static scapular position (Kibler test) of the dominant and non-dominant sides between the two groups (P>0.05).

Conclusion: There were no significant differences in scapular position and scapular movement pattern between the individuals with and without rounded shoulder posture.

Full-Text [PDF 559 kb]   (482 Downloads)    
Type of Study: Research | Subject: Special
Received: 2015/04/21 | Accepted: 2015/08/30 | Published: 2015/10/1

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